Christian Home Business Information

Maybe you want to own and operate a Christian home business for one or more reasons such as:

1. The demographic for your services and goods are primarily Christians
2. You want to operate a business based on Christian biblical principles
3. You want the business to have minimal operating expenses (no separate office space needed).
4. You want to increase your quality of life (work & family balanced time, more time for your family and working with family).
5. You want your work to have more meaning and purpose aligned with Christian ethics.

There is nothing wrong with becoming a homepreneur with faith-based integrity, excellent customer service, charitable and a profitable business.

The owner of a Christian home business tends to be primarily motivated by serving others and remaining profitable for the long term. Yes, it is possible to accomplish those objectives by careful research and selection of a business that allows the owner and staff to operate in faith-based integrity at all times.

Your research of home based opportunities can consist of internet searches, visiting the local library, chamber of commerce and networking (on-line and offline).

What are some of the potential benefits from starting a Christian home business? By increasing your sphere of influence and opportunities to share your faith with other business owners and customers as you develop great relationships.

Maybe to fund a special project for a ministry or non-profit organization? How about having some extra funds for canceling debts, providing things for your family or giving a special offering to your church or Pastor?

Think about the advantages of opting out of climbing the ladder of success that can cause you to be a stranger to your spouse and children. It is most likely a rare thing for someone on their death bed saying “I wish I had spent more time at the office than with my family”.

If you’re wanting out of the rat race, 12 hour work days, 2 hours of traffic and being on call 24 x 7, then seeking options now for a Christian Home Business maybe right for you.

You can put balance back into your life by making a decision that the current situation has to change. Then start seeking options, knock on doors of opportunity and boldly enter the door into the realm of homepreneurs.

You will be glad that you did. Ready, Get Set, Go and meet your opportunity today.

Software Telemarketing – Best Means in Handling Sensitive Business Information

One of the best functions that ERP software manufacturers and resellers provide is a means of transmitting and organizing business information in the most streamlined manner possible. Providers of that kind of software focus their role in rooting deficiencies in a company’s ERP.

However, do take note though that since ERP is an integral part in the stability of a company’s structure, it’s not surprising that plenty of companies aren’t willing to admit that there could be something wrong with it. That information is sensitive. It may not be as sensitive as information pertaining to national security, but if you’re a mega-corporation, it can come a close second to that. Some of them would even go as far as desperately search for an adequate ERP software developer whilst declining to answer any questions (like ones posed by a competitor’s spies) on the possible flaws in their ERP.

Do remember though that it’s never a wise course of action for a business to just wait around for a desperate buyer. The competition will leave them behind. Therefore, how does one go about sparking interest in their product without triggering this defense mechanism of denial?

Telemarketing firms exist as a solution to that. In the practice of B2B lead generation, telemarketing agents are trained extensively to know exactly the right questions to task and are determined enough not to let rejection stop them. Furthermore, they have largely invested in databases chock full of businesses who might have problems that only good ERP software can provide. Couple that with expert data analysts who organize and refine their information to suit a client’s preferences, you have a means that is fast, wide-covering, and also cost-efficient.

To top it off, all those employed by such companies are sworn to the secrecy of whatever sensitive information they obtain (be it from you or from the contacts they have). The security of their information is critical to their standing. They will not just give it to anyone and those they contact are guaranteed both privacy and discreet use of what they have been given.

Controversial as this may sound, every company has secrets it doesn’t want leaking out. Be that secret come in the form of information about a future product, outlines for marketing plans, or problems with the company’s ERP unnoticed by the general public, sensitive information like that can be exploited by their competitors (or worse). It is therefore understandable that they take whatever measure to make sure that information remains within company bounds. If that means declining questions or even straight-face denial, then there’s not much choice.

The downside to that though is it also locks out the inquiries of people like you, who are honestly just wanting to know if there is anything your software can do for them. Outsourcing to a telemarketing firm can help bypass that by lending you not only a private database of people on the look out for aid but also the expertise of agents who ask only the right questions without triggering any alarms.

Organising Your Business Information For Your Accountant

I often have new business clients which are not sure what information to give me as their accountant or bookkeeper in order to prepare Australian Accounting and Tax returns, or Financial statements. So I have put together a brief explanation of a simple method of getting it all together. If you use this simple method you will not only look professional to your accountants but save them time (by doing some of the legwork and having all of the relevant information available) getting you a cheaper accounting invoice by saving accounting time and you money. This is a process primarily for businesses which, do not have an internal accounts or bookkeeper person and simply provide information to accountants to prepare returns.

I want to stress that all good businesses know how well they are doing. In fact many businesses fail because of a lack of current financial information. It is vital you know your current financial position and profit or loss statement ideally monthly or at least quarterly if the business is well established with comfortable cash flow. If you are a business who only reviews their financial position annually, I strongly recommend you consider obtaining more regular financial information. This is so you have relevant information to manage your business and profitability. This can easily be done by engaging in a bookkeeper or accountant who can also come to your office. However if you wish to prepare information for the accountant and bring it to their office here is a quick process for you to complete.

The starting point of accounting is that it is based on recording all transactions from bank statements of all relevant bank accounts including cheque accounts, investments,credit cards and loans. For this reason, businesses should aim to track all business transactions through one of their bank accounts and hence have little or no cash transactions. If you have cash transactions you may need to provide additional information.

Step one
The first simple step is to collate all your bank statements of all business accounts, credit cards and loans for the period you need to report on. Some examples to illustrate the periods involved for a tax return 2010 you’ll need to gather statements from 1st of July 2009 to 30th of June 2010, or for a BAS return March 2010 you will need to gather statements from 1 January 2010 to 31 March 2010. You should receive all statements from your bank, if any are lost or misplaced your need to reorder from your bank incurring normally a bank fee. Sort this out before you provide the accountant your information. Better still accountants love to get electronic files of your bank statements as they are quick and easier to data entry, contact your bank to do this.

Step two
Once you have collated all bank statements review all individual lines and code them with relevant information (write a relevant description of them if not obvious from the bank statement line entry). For example all credit entries all money going into your accounts, you should indicate if they are income or sometimes they are owner contributions. With all money expended (money out) from accounts, you should also be describing relevant details especially cheque numbers and EFT transfers. Remember any additional information may be useful to your accountant such as asset detail so they can process specific taxation rules. If you are GST registered, you should also indicate whether the transaction involved GST or was GST free. The more you code the more you make your financial reports accurate and speed up things for your accountants processing which will lead to cheaper fees.

Step three
If you have coded all bank statements as for step two and have made sure all relevant bank statements have been collated. You may provide this to the accountant so that the financial report can be prepared. However, as tax law requires substantiation of your transactions and keeping these records, I would also suggest, attaching all relevant invoices relating to transactions on each bank statement. There may be a few transactions which do not have invoices such as bank charges and direct debit all regular charges loan payments etc. You may have other ways of filing invoices which are also acceptable.

This has been a quick outline of how to provide information to your accountant to prepare your financial or taxation reports. It is advisable eventually for a business to take the next step and to complete it’s bookkeeping internally which may result in even greater savings. I recommend this is done with the combination of internal resources, suitable accounting software and professional accounting involvement to control and develop the financial information further. Speak to an accountant or business adviser on this issue or to discuss installing an accounting software and training you to do some of the work. Often this will streamline some of your other administration tasks such as payroll, quoting and invoicing customers, knowing which debtor accounts are due or to facilitate a purchase ordering system, and to better track creditors or cash flow.

However, if you know book work is not an optimal use of your time and do not have internal resources, please do use a professional registered BAS agent, TAX agent (in Australia) or registered accountant in your country. But, perhaps consider updating your financial information on a more regular basis. I also had a recent experience with a client who did not wish to prepare their accounts themselves, but is available when I am coding their transactions; they were also able to see how the financial report is put together giving them a better understanding of the financial information. I also recommend that you do query, and get involved with the information provided to you at a summarized level so that you are sure that it is correct.

Overall, the key to book work is to do it regularly to stay on top of it and to complete while many transactions are fresh in your memory. Having up-to-date financial reports will give you a greater sense of pride in knowing how your business is tracking. By having current financial information you are in the much more informed position to make better business management as against having only annual and lagged financial information from your accountant.

Keep Your Business Information Quiet: Loose Lips Sink Companies

We have this idea that computer hackers are ingeniously bright people. We hear stories, true or otherwise, as to how they seem to finagle valuable information from us, using the most sophisticated social engineering techniques. In reality, they often use such tricky questions as, “I’m calling from the IT Department. We’re doing some system checks on your T-3 line. I’ll need to reprogram your current password with a new one. You’re using the one that’s all letters, right?”

And so we dutifully comply with what seems to be a reasonable and logical request from some resident authority figure who surely has our best interests in mind. Often within minutes, we will reveal confidential company or personal information, over the phone, or through an email reply to a complete stranger who talks or writes a good line.

Reading all this and reflecting on your own sense of eternal security vigilance, you’ll swear that you’d never give out a byte of confidential or important data, over the phone, across cyberspace, or even face-to-face. Your motto is: “Hang me up by my thumbs for a week and I still wouldn’t even tell you my first name.”

And all this may be true when you believe the information requester may be a wolf in sheep’s leggings, but how about when the asker-to-be is from your local or national news media? Are you still tight-lipped and careful, or do you get caught up in the glow of the First Amendment’s pad and pen, the video camera, or the microphone? It’s hard for even savvy security professionals not to spill some beans when faced with the often flattering request for information and a chance to demonstrate subject matter expertise.

But just as loose lips sink ships, the desire to provide information to the media must be measured by the impact, or more accurately, the harms a few words or figures can betray.

Several years ago, the Business section of the Orange County (Calif.) Register, featured a two-page photo spread on the history of the Southland Corporation’s reason for being: the 7-11 store. Along with a history of the Big Gulp business, the piece featured an interview with Anaheim 7-11 franchisee Herb Domeño, owner of nine stores, including the site at Katella and Harbor. For those not familiar with southern California real estate, this prime property is directly adjacent to an Enchanted Kingdom knows as Disneyland.

Back then, Mr. Domeño’s stone’s throw-to-Disneyland convenience store boasted the highest sales volume in the country – an average of $3 million per year, clearly above the national sales-per-store average of about $1.3 million per year.

Taking out our trusty calculators, we could have determined that, give or take some up or down days in the boom-boom 1990’s, Mr. Domeño’s enterprise took in about $8,000 per day.

And how did we discern this figure? It’s easy to uncover, especially when the $3 million sales amount is featured boldly in the photo caption of Mr. Domeño in his cash-cow store. (By the way, the new national sales record for one 7-11 convenience store belongs to the folks running the show in Southampton, NY.

So what has the Orange County Register just told every enterprising convenience store robber who can read? This place is full of cash and even if they aren’t cleaning up like they did before Disneyland closed a nearby parking lot to make room for its California Adventure addition, Mr. Stickup Artist has to believe it’s worth a shot.

Even if the daily revenue figure is adjusted for slow days and customers who pay with debit or credit cards, it’s still a substantial amount of cash that is either on the premises or being moved, via some safe means we hope, to the bank.

In times of organizational crisis, it’s wise to have a designated member of the executive team speak to the print or TV media. This person will have the training, experience, and savvy to say the right things, at the right times. News gatherers, on the other hand, won’t always seek out your Director of Corporate Communications (or similarly-titled representative). If they want the juicy details, any gossip, or the “inside story,” they might go to any executive or manager they can find, or worse, to an employee, who gives an opinion as if it was a fact.

In a perfect world, the security professional would also be part of the discussion and review of any press release, placed article, or editorial coming from the organization that has any security-related content. “Facts and figures” statements tossed out like: “Our security system is so sophisticated it only takes one guard per eight-hour shift to operate it,” or “Our jewelry store revenues have never been higher” might be great PR, but they can turn your business into a new target, by people or groups who never considered it as one before.

If you’re tasked with speaking to a media member about any aspect of your business operations or performance, choose your words carefully. Use the technique every politician is trained in from birth: bridging. Bridging simply requires you to “bridge over” to the question you want to answer versus the question you’re asked.

This approach works best when you’re asked the question you don’t really want to answer, i.e. Reporter: “Isn’t it true that your firm’s movement to stricter access control has created a `prison camp environment’ for your employees and customers?” Security Professional: “As you know, our approach has always been to put the safety and security needs of our people and our customers first. As such, we believe in creating the best working environment possible…”

Get the idea? You don’t answer a direct, confrontive question with a direct, assertive answer on point. You vary the response to make sure you cover your points, not theirs.
When in doubt, choose to be bland, especially with any information that hints of having a financial, proprietary, or trade-secret connection. “We’ve got a good handle on our inventory” sounds so much better than, “We’ve got a ton of expensive stuff laying around our warehouse.”

The old adage all publicity is good publicity has its exceptions. Better for people to read about your firm and have to make assumptions about your security, than to know too much detail.